Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Hair Loss, depression and anxiety

Hair Loss, depression and anxiety

I don't think people realise how much hair loss can affect a person's mental health. because to the likes of you and I who have a full head of hair, it's no big deal right? 

WRONG.

Losing your hair is like losing a little bit of yourself with each and every strand you find stuck in the sink. With each hair that comes away, another little bit of your confidence chips away with it. It's the longing to pull your hair line forward, to be able to style it the way that you like and not being able to do anything about it, looking at your 5 year old's full head of hair and wishing you could try it on for size.

Losing your hair is depressing. It knocks your self esteem and given the chance it can feel like you have had your identity robbed from beneath you. Male pattern baldness (MPB), the main cause of hair loss, and it affects an estimated quarter of men by the age of 30 and two-thirds by the age of 60.

I am talking from the perspective of a partner looking in from the outside. My other half has been struggling and trying to fight hair loss for the last 5 years or so, and I have witnessed first hand just how soul destroying this experience has been for him. 

Although he paint's on a brave face for the rest of the world, and laughs at the relentless jokes about his receding hair line, I know that every time someone has chuckle or makes a remark it cuts him up inside, but still he paints a smile and laughs it off, but deep down it makes him think about looking into a hair transplant again.

Last year we secretly visited a place about hair transplants, I went along for moral support and to find out whether my other half would be a candidate, we drove for a few hours to make this appointment but we went in secret. Friends and family thought that the journey was really a business meeting, he didn't want to draw attention to the fact that we were really going along to discuss what options he could have in rejuvenating his hair line. 

It is becoming more socially acceptable now though thanks to recent successful hair transplants on celebrities like Wayne Rooney, James Nesbitt and X Factor judge Louis Walsh. The meeting did not go the way that he had first hoped, and at this time he was not a candidate for a hair transplant, but who knows what the next few years may bring...

Hair loss is almost a journey of self acceptance, changing with the times and learning to embrace what you can't change. It's like having control completely taken away from you and I guess to put it in terms to an outsider it would be asking them to walk around with a big red nose on their hooters for the the rest of their lives. 

We live in a time where appearance is apparently everything, we all think too much about how we look. We want to feel happy in the skin (and hair) that we are in. Over the past couple of years I have looked into many hair therapies and the vast line of products that can supposedly work their wonders on male pattern hair loss, but so far we haven't really struck gold.  

We have tried lotions that you rub into the scalp, we have tried the Theradome Laser Helmet and we have tried tablets and shampoos. No stone has been left un-turned in the quest to slow down the hair loss and hopefully help it rejuvenate.

When it comes to hair loss it is worth remembering that the person that this is happening to, might be silently devastated inside. They might laugh at your witty joke (that they are probably hearing for the 1000th time), but inside this might just be soul destroying, and you have to ask yourself whether making that joke in the first place is worth that. 

Hair loss is not funny, hair loss can be a fight that chips away a little piece of you everyday.

Next time you make a joke, think about what is going on behind the smile on their face and the glassy look in their eyes.






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